Results
Animal:    |    Searching by:    |    Results:

General Information

Other links

Parturition Associated Colic and Post Foaling Colic in Horses

Description
Episodes of mild colicky behaviour and serious colic are common in mares around the time of birth. Also see: Colic in Horses

Pre-Foaling Colic
Almost all mares have recurring short mild episodes of colicky behaviour prior to birth. They generally start the last month and may be missed completely if the mare is not frequently watched. The mare will have short episodes of mild depression, laying down quietly, or inappetance. Rarely will these episodes last longer than 20 minutes and usually mild stimulation like walking will bring the mare out of it. It is uncertain what causes these episodes but may represent periods of foal activity or altered bowel motility or contractions of uterus musculature.

Post-Foaling Colic
Just following parturition the uterus begins contracting, particularly in response to nursing. These contractions will cause short periods of crampiness that may result in the mare laying down and getting up and usually will pass in the first 30 minutes to an hour after birth. If colicklike behaviour is so common when do I start to worry? Well, you should worry any time you see a mare colicking just realize: frequently mild colic at these times is not uncommon and can be self limiting. If the colic persists or walking does not help, or if it proceeds to more severe signs than mild depressions, short inappetance, or just laying sternal, than it may indicate other problems that require medical or surgical intervention. If a veterinarian is difficult to get promptly and the mare a cadidate for surgery if the problem is severe you may want to call at the first signs of problems. Impactions, torsion of the large bowel, rupture of the uterine ligaments, or uterine artery rupture are some of the more common causes of serious pre-foaling colic.



Additional information


Pre-Foaling Colic
Almost all mares have recurring short mild episodes of colicky behaviour prior to birth. They generally start the last month and may be missed completely if the mare is not frequently watched. The mare will have short episodes of mild depression, laying down quietly, or inappetance. Rarely will these episodes last longer than 20 minutes and usually mild stimulation like walking will bring the mare out of it. It is uncertain what causes these episodes but may represent periods of foal activity or altered bowel motility or contractions of uterus musculature.

Post-Foaling Colic
Just following parturition the uterus begins contracting, particularly in response to nursing. These contractions will cause short periods of crampiness that may result in the mare laying down and getting up and usually will pass in the first 30 minutes to an hour after birth.
  • More serious colic courses can be large bowel torsion, broad ligament hematoma and uterine rupture.
  • About | General terms and conditions | Send feedback | Signup | Login